The Power of Assumptions

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“For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind.” 2 Timothy 1:7 (NKJV)

Assumption, we all do it all the time and it’s costly.

The assumption battle is one I have fought most of my life. I’ve questioned friends’ motives, assuming they were against me. To avoid being hurt, I’ve detached from relationships with no valid reasons.

Perhaps you’ve fought the same battle?

Your friend didn’t sit with you in Bible study like she usually does; she must be upset with you, so you avoid her at your weekly meetings. Another friend is invited to several parties you aren’t; obviously the two of you are drifting apart, so you don’t reach out any more. Your sister hasn’t responded to your text and phone messages; she must have found another friend in whom to confide, so you stop calling her.

It’s easy to assume others are upset, have “more important” friends, or are too busy for us when their behavior changes. Anger and hurt can well up in our hearts and we may pull away from friendships in order to protect ourselves. There is a danger in assumptions: they can destroy relationships.

Before we know it, even without proof, what we assume becomes our truth. Our misguided feelings lead to misguided thoughts, which cause misguided responses. The result: ruined relationships.

Living under the havoc of assumptions isn’t the way God intended it though. Second Timothy 1:7 tells us, “For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind” (NKJV). Looking at the last part of this verse, we see God gives us the ability to think, reason, and understand.

Through Christ, we have a mind that is well balanced and considers things in context. Our sound mind is stronger than our feelings, but we have to give our thoughts time to catch up with our emotions. A good way to do this is to pause and think clearly about the conclusions we’ve made.

When an assumption rears its ugly head, simply take a moment to ask if this assumption is consistent with your friend’s normal behavior. If it isn’t, this would be a good time to ask a few more questions: Is my friend okay? Have I done anything to hurt her? How can I pray for her? Do I believe the best before assuming the worst?

Repeat the pause until the assumption passes. The result: positive relationships.

Ruined relationships can be prevented and assumptions can be put to rest when we stop and focus on our thoughts. God has blessed us with a sound mind to surrender to the truth and not allow our imaginations to run wild.

Before the power of assumptions ruins a relationship in your life, pause. Settle your emotions and consider what you know to be true about your friend. Take a moment to pray for her and plan how to reach out to her. She might just be struggling with her own assumptions that you could help her clear up!

Dear Lord, thank You for empowering me to overpower assumptions. I commit to believe the best before assuming the worst, and to not allow my emotions to jump to conclusions. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Related Resources:
Would you like to bring the message of this devotion to the women of your church? Click here to find out more about considering Wendy Pope as your next retreat / key note speaker. And be sure to visit Wendy’s blog today as she shares how she overcame the power assumptions had on her life.

Trusting God for a Better Tomorrow Bible Study by Wendy Pope, available in a printable download, Kindle, Nook, and hardcopy.

The I Am His medallion necklace is a great reminder that we belong to Christ and His truths are ours to hold on to! Click here for more information.

Reflect and Respond:
What power have assumptions had on your life?

Reach out and make an attempt to reconcile with someone with whom you made an assumption.

Power Verses:
2 Corinthians 10:5, “We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ.” (NIV)

Philippians 2:4, “Don’t be concerned only about your own interests, but also be concerned about the interests of others.” (GW)

~Credit to Proverbs 31 Ministries

What if you lost everything

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This morning on my way to work, I was challenged by Pastor Chuck Swindoll, a pastor who airs his sermon on the KKLA 99.5 FM Christian radio station: What if you lost everything today? What if suddenly, you lost your health, your job and everything that matters most to you and you don’t know what to do. Everything, completely everything is gone in just a few seconds. What then? What now? What will you do? Who will you blame? Who will you curse? And how will you move beyond this devastation?

And so, here I go, I start to play an image in my head of HR showing up at my work place with a pink slip addressed in my name and a small Office Depot box to pack my belongings and quit the premises or else. Then, I started thinking of all my bills that will be left unpaid, the half-empty fridge that needs to be fed, my newly renewed cell phone contract because I wanted a new phone, not being able to tithe for church, Christmas presents that I won’t be able to buy this year and the list continues on and on for days.

I was like, “Oh, Lord, that’s a lot to think about.” I ask God, “What am I supposed to do and what will happen to me?” I started to panic and over think things that were unfounded and not true. Immediately, God stepped in into my thinking brain and halted all the crazy thoughts that were swimming in my head by whispering into my ears and saying, “Sue, in this life, nothing is for certain. Just keep doing what you’re supposed to do in My name, and I will continue to bless you.” I kid you not, I was a little scared that He spoke so loud and clearly in my ears. But I calmed down, stayed still and started praying. I surrendered all my fears and anxieties to Him in my prayers and accepted the promises that were spoken to me. Then, once I moved past my fears, God gave me His peace. His supernatural peace calmed my jumpy spirit and helped soothe my anxiety of not knowing what to do about my “what if’s.”

Encouragement for today:

Continue to praise God and keep doing what you’re doing that pleases Him. Be in constant fellowship with Him because only He is consistent and forever because our life can be snuffed out in any moment. Nothing is guaranteed in this world. Nothing is forever in this world. Only the Word of God and His promises are forever. Praise Him for thoroughness, for his provision and for His unexplainable peace that washes over us.

Love,

Sue

Doing What Is Right In God’s Sight

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~ Wallpaper is not mine. 🙂

 

Good morning, a great inspirational devotional message for you today:

“If you diligently heed the voice of the LORD your God and do what is right in His sight, give ear to His commandments and keep all His statutes, I will put none of the diseases on you which I have brought on the Egyptians. For I am the LORD who heals you.” 

Exodus 15:26

In many ways, modern cultures are like the ancient society of Israel — everybody doing what is right in his or her own eyes. In pluralistic cultures where tolerance is the highest value, people hold dear the right to do whatever they want. And indeed, citizens have that right (up to a point). But it’s the consequences that arise over time that people don’t like.

When God brought the Hebrew slaves out of Egypt, the people agreed to “do what is right in His sight” (Exodus 15:26). That was the covenant agreement the people entered into, God promising to bless them for their willingness, in essence, to set aside what they thought was right and do what God said is right. However, their commitment didn’t last long (Judges 17:6; 21:25). By the time Solomon became king he identified as fools those who do what is right in their own eyes (Proverbs 12:15; 21:2).

Wise are the people who are willing to believe that what God says is right, is right for them.

Nothing is right for a Christian if it is not God’s will for him. 
John Blanchard